This Months Book Suggestion:

Lies My Teacher Told Me

Note each title has a DB number before it. This is the catalog number given if you use the free ...

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Tip of the Month:

More Time to Cross

If you need more time to cross a specific intersection in your area or on a frequent route, you h...

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News


Safety While Traveling as a Pedestrian

Aug 9, 2019 @ 9:00 am - Julie Wright

Walking is a great way for us to stay healthy in mind and body. However, there may be some challenges that keep some from walking. Vision loss or blindness may cause people to lose confidence in their ability to be a safe pedestrian, so they choose to be less active in their community. Unfortunately, this can create many unsafe situations for all parties involved.

The Hull Foundation would like to take some time to discuss what you can do to become a safer pedestrian, allowing you to keep your social life and activity at a healthy level. Following are 3 suggestions:

  1. Get proper mobility training
  2. Know pedestrian laws
  3. Understand how a pedestrian signal and accessible pedestrian signal (APS) works

Proper mobility training

Deciding to get proper mobility training means you can build better skills to help navigate inside buildings, your home, your neighborhood, and places around traffic. You will build skills and problem solve to learn, maintain, and/or regain your orientation. Assess intersections while learning street crossing strategies. These skills help build confidence to navigate the world so you can stay active and strong.

This type of training is called Orientation and Mobility (O&M). There are professionals who specialize in teaching O&M called Orientation and Mobility Specialists (O&Ms). There are independent contractors, others work for State commissions for the blind, and some are friends of the Hull Foundation for the Blind and have offered their services to our guests.

If you would like to contact an O&M specialist, feel free to call:

Know pedestrian laws

Each state has their own Right-of-Way laws that are made to protect drivers and pedestrians. Drivers have specific laws they need to follow while driving through intersections and encountering pedestrians. Pedestrians also have laws they must follow. For example, pedestrians must obey the lights at a controlled intersection.

Did you know that according to Oregon Law (ORS 814.040); if a pedestrian crosses a roadway outside of a marked or unmarked crosswalk they do not have the right-of-way and must yield to any vehicles in the roadway? Otherwise the pedestrian is at fault. The pedestrian is also at fault if they suddenly leave a curb or place of safety and move into the path of a vehicle that is so close, they create an immediate hazard.

According to Oregon Law (801.220) a "crosswalk" exists at any public street intersection, whether marked with paint or unmarked. However, whenever marked crosswalks have been indicated, such crosswalks and no others shall be deemed lawful to cross at that intersection. It is also important to know that crosswalks also exist between intersections (mid-block) but only if they are marked with white painted lines.

Under Oregon Law (ORS Chapter 811), a pedestrian is crossing the roadway in a crosswalk when any part or extension of the pedestrian, including but not limited to any part of the pedestrians body, wheelchair, cane, crutch or bicycle moves into the roadway in a crosswalk with the intent to proceed.

Of course, a pedestrian with blindness would not know if the crosswalks are painted or if the pedestrian walk light shows the walk interval. That is why getting O&M training is so important. Trained professionals are there to teach people how to navigate through a sighted world and how to use the tools available to do it safely.

Understand how a pedestrian signal works

Did you know that intersections with pedestrian push buttons provide pedestrians with more time to cross but only if the button is pushed? The Department of Transportation usually calculates how long a crossing should take by assuming the average pedestrian travels at 3.5 to 4 feet per second. You can contact the Department of Transportation to ask for more time to cross at specific intersections.

Even if you aren not interested in crossing streets, O&M training can help you be a better traveler indoors.

Knowledge is liberating! Expand yours.

Archive

News


Safety While Traveling as a Pedestrian

Aug 9, 2019 @ 9:00 am - Julie Wright

Walking is a great way for us to stay healthy in mind and body. However, there may be some challenges that keep some from walking. Vision loss or blindness may cause people to lose confidence in their ability to be a safe pedestrian, so they choose to be less active in their community. Unfortunately, this can create many unsafe situations for all parties involved.

The Hull Foundation would like to take some time to discuss what you can do to become a safer pedestrian, allowing you to keep your social life and activity at a healthy level. Following are 3 suggestions:

  1. Get proper mobility training
  2. Know pedestrian laws
  3. Understand how a pedestrian signal and accessible pedestrian signal (APS) works

Proper mobility training

Deciding to get proper mobility training means you can build better skills to help navigate inside buildings, your home, your neighborhood, and places around traffic. You will build skills and problem solve to learn, maintain, and/or regain your orientation. Assess intersections while learning street crossing strategies. These skills help build confidence to navigate the world so you can stay active and strong.

This type of training is called Orientation and Mobility (O&M). There are professionals who specialize in teaching O&M called Orientation and Mobility Specialists (O&Ms). There are independent contractors, others work for State commissions for the blind, and some are friends of the Hull Foundation for the Blind and have offered their services to our guests.

If you would like to contact an O&M specialist, feel free to call:

Know pedestrian laws

Each state has their own Right-of-Way laws that are made to protect drivers and pedestrians. Drivers have specific laws they need to follow while driving through intersections and encountering pedestrians. Pedestrians also have laws they must follow. For example, pedestrians must obey the lights at a controlled intersection.

Did you know that according to Oregon Law (ORS 814.040); if a pedestrian crosses a roadway outside of a marked or unmarked crosswalk they do not have the right-of-way and must yield to any vehicles in the roadway? Otherwise the pedestrian is at fault. The pedestrian is also at fault if they suddenly leave a curb or place of safety and move into the path of a vehicle that is so close, they create an immediate hazard.

According to Oregon Law (801.220) a "crosswalk" exists at any public street intersection, whether marked with paint or unmarked. However, whenever marked crosswalks have been indicated, such crosswalks and no others shall be deemed lawful to cross at that intersection. It is also important to know that crosswalks also exist between intersections (mid-block) but only if they are marked with white painted lines.

Under Oregon Law (ORS Chapter 811), a pedestrian is crossing the roadway in a crosswalk when any part or extension of the pedestrian, including but not limited to any part of the pedestrians body, wheelchair, cane, crutch or bicycle moves into the roadway in a crosswalk with the intent to proceed.

Of course, a pedestrian with blindness would not know if the crosswalks are painted or if the pedestrian walk light shows the walk interval. That is why getting O&M training is so important. Trained professionals are there to teach people how to navigate through a sighted world and how to use the tools available to do it safely.

Understand how a pedestrian signal works

Did you know that intersections with pedestrian push buttons provide pedestrians with more time to cross but only if the button is pushed? The Department of Transportation usually calculates how long a crossing should take by assuming the average pedestrian travels at 3.5 to 4 feet per second. You can contact the Department of Transportation to ask for more time to cross at specific intersections.

Even if you aren not interested in crossing streets, O&M training can help you be a better traveler indoors.

Knowledge is liberating! Expand yours.

Archive